COLD & FLU INFORMATION

Cold

Facts

Facts

The common cold is an upper respiratory tract infection. Colds affect the nose, throat and upper airways.4 Most colds are caused by a viral infection.1

Adults generally experience 2-4 colds a year, while children may experience 5-10 colds per year.2

Symptoms

Symptoms

The symptoms of a cold can include the below, or various combinations of:

  • Blocked nose
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Headache
Causes

Causes

An airborne virus causes the common cold.
Colds can be contagious and spread with sneezing, coughing and hand contact.1
Colds are more common in winter as people spend more time indoors with each other.1

Treatment

Treatment

You can help fight your cold with rest and plenty of water. You can also choose a product which helps relieve your symptoms. Demazin offers a broad range of products for adults and children which are specifically formulated to provide effective relief of symptoms.

Prevention

Prevention

Colds can spread quickly and easily, particularly between family members. To help reduce your risk of catching a cold…3

  • Wash hands often with soap and water and dry them thoroughly
  • Keep hands away from the face
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Avoid sharing cups/glasses, dishes and cutlery

If you have a cold, you can reduce the risk of spreading it by…3

  • Regularly blowing your nose, using tissues only once and discarding immediately
  • Covering your nose and mouth when coughing/sneezing
  • Cough/sneeze into a tissue or your elbow rather than into your hands
  • Resting and drinking plenty of water

  1. Better Health Channel. Colds Fact Sheet.
    http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/%28Pages%29/Colds_explained?OpenDocument [accessed 10/04/2015]
  2. NPS Medicinewise. Common Cold Fact Sheet. http://www.nps.org.au/conditions/respiratory-problems/respiratory-tract-infections/for-individuals/conditions/common-cold [accessed 10/04/2015]
  3. Mayo Clinic. Common Cold Fact Sheet. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/common-cold/basics/prevention/con-20019062 [accessed 10/04/205]

Flu

Facts

Facts

Also known as “influenza”, the flu is caused by the influenza type A, B or (rarely) C virus.4

The flu is a viral infection affecting your nose, throat and sometimes your lungs.4

Symptoms

Symptoms

Typical symptoms5 can include:

  • Fever
  • Dry, chesty cough
  • Muscle and joint pain
  • Tiredness/ fatigue
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • Blocked or runny nose

Symptoms of a flu are generally more severe than a cold, typically6:

  • Flu symptoms usually last longer, up to a week (cold symptoms last a few days)
  • The flu may cause a high fever (a cold causes only a mild fever)
  • Muscular pains and shivering occur with the flu (not with a cold)
  • The flu usually starts with a dry sensation in the nose and throat (while colds cause a runny nose).
Causes

Causes

The flu virus is usually spread when a person who is infected sneezes or coughs, releasing droplets that contain the virus into the air. These droplets can be transferred to anyone who breathes them in or touches a contaminated surface5

Treatment

Treatment

Bed rest, keeping warm, drinking plenty of fluids and an effective medication like Demazin help relieve symptoms of the flu.

Prevention

Prevention

Help prevent the spread of flu by…5

  • Washing your hands regularly with soap and running water
  • Coughing and sneezing into your arm or into a tissue, then throwing it away
  • Covering your mouth with your hand when sneezing or coughing
  • Keeping your hands away from your eyes, nose and mouth
  • Don’t share items like cups, glasses and cutlery

  1. Healthdirect Australia. Colds and Flu Fact Sheet. http://www.healthdirect.gov.au/colds-and-flu [accessed 10/04/2015]
  2. NPS Medicinewise. Influenza Fact Sheet. http://www.nps.org.au/conditions/respiratory-problems/respiratory-tract-infections/for-individuals/conditions/influenza [accessed 10/04/2015]
  3. Better Health Channel. Flu Fact Sheet.
    http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Flu_influenza?open [accessed 10/04/2015]